Day 165: The Man and the Fallacious Farce of Funny Fortune Cookies; ‘Fortune’

We all know what’s coming in five days now. Presents, family, friends, good will towards man, and the 24-hour ceaseless replay of the 1983 Christmas classic, A Christmas Story. Now I used to love this movie, honestly. I thought it had some of the greatest depictions of classic Americana of the time period (1950s). Who can forget the countless cultural images that stemmed from that movie. ‘I double dog dare you’, ‘You’ll poke your eye out’, the leg lamp. One of my favorite scenes is at the end where (spoiler alert) after a disastrous run in with neighborhood dogs and their turkey, they go to a local Chinese restaurant for their Christmas party. ‘It was the year we were introduced to Chinese turkey.’

You know what comes at the end of every American Chinese meal, don’t you?

FORTUNE COOKIES!

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And I want to stress this with utmost importance, that this is strictly a western tradition. You would be hard pressed to find a fortune cookie in China. They originated in California, though its origins are, like many things that have permeated our culture, foggy and disputed. Supposedly they were started in 1918 by Chinese immigrant David Jung at the Hong Kong Noodle Company. The original cookies simply had thank you notes for patrons. The ‘lucky numbers’, ‘learn Chinese’, and more humorous notes were products of time and popularity.

And in case you’re tired of your one friend always making the same old ‘help I’m trapped in a fortune cookie factory’ joke, Wonton Food in Queens set out to make more serious, value-added, and fortune-related sayings.

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I’ve even seen some videos on YouTube of people using fortune cookies to propose. I can’t recall the movie, but I do remember there was a comedy where the main guy was planning to propose to his girlfriend at a Chinese restaurant, but the restaurant accidentally gave the proposal cookie to the wrong table!

In case you were ever wondering about what those blue boxes on the corners are for, they are markers for the paper-cutters as to where one fortune ends and another begins. Sometimes though mistakes are made, to great effect.

I hope I am not the only one who likes to play the ‘in bed’ game with fortune cookies too. This is when you try to see who gets the funniest/most inappropriate fortune by adding the phrase ‘in bed’ to the very end. Any winners?

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It’s not the catchiest or funniest out there, but my wish for you all is to have a very happy Christmas and a wonderful new year. May the holiday season bring you fortune, laughter, and love.

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Day 165

Man: 137 Loneliness: 28

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8 thoughts on “Day 165: The Man and the Fallacious Farce of Funny Fortune Cookies; ‘Fortune’

  1. As fate, fortune, coincidence would have it, two of my work colleagues and I had a discussion regarding the origin of fortune cookies *today*. I didn’t start it so it wasn’t some subliminal “fortune” prompt. One colleague said that it might have been a Japanese gardener at a Japanese Tea House in Golden Gate Park who started fortune cookies. I do like “Run.” lol

    Liked by 1 person

    • I would probably have been inclined to follow a fortune cookie as foreboding as that. Wouldn’t it be the greatest start to an ‘accidental spy’ type movie?! Hahah. I have heard about that as well! Turns out the Japanese have been serving rice cookies with little slips of paper in it as early as the 1500s. Quite possible, but it must not have caught on as much with them.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you! Yeah fortune cookies were always a highlight of a Chinese meal. When I was younger I’d hope to get one like ‘you will fall into a great fortune soon’ or ‘a surprise is coming your way’ but I’d get those weird sayings instead like ‘recognize your prime wherever in life it may occur’. How does a 7 year old process that?!

      Liked by 1 person

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